Perception.....something to think about!



Read More: Mindset

Perception
 
    ..something  to think about...

Washington, D.C., Metro Station on a cold January morning in 2007.

The man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approximately two thousand people went through the station, most of them on their way to work. 
After 3 minutes a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing.  He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule. 
4  minutes later:  The violinist received his first dollar; a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.
 
6  minutes:  A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.
10  minutes:  A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly.  The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time.  This action was repeated by several other children.  Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly. 
45  minutes:  The musician played continuously.  Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while.  About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace.  The man  collected a total of $32. 
1  hour:  He finished playing and silence took over.  No one noticed.  No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

 
No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world.  He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.  Two days before Joshua Bell sold out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $200.00.

This is a true story.  Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities.
The questions raised:  In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it?  Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One  conclusion reached from this experiment could be this:  If we do not have a moment to stop and  listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made, how many other things are we missing?

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About the Author: Adrian Armstrong

Member Since: 01/25/2008

Company: Empower Network and SevenPoint2

Industry: Business Opportunities

Primary Web Site: http://www.adrianarmstrong.com

Comments



Perception

Great article Adrian, we are too busy in are own little lives, we fail to "wake up & smell the roses" As far as perception is concerned, I speak to people all the time who failed because this that him her etc etc, recession......But they wont change, they don`t see the common denominator, "THEY were always at the scene of the crime" but they plod onwards, past the great musician...well done Adrian again

Nick Rees — Fri, 09/25/2009 - 10:05am

So true!

Thank you for this article...I have played violin (for many years),and teach, and this almost made me cry...so very true...isn't it sad we get our lives going like this...argh. :) What a blessing he was to someone that day! The Kids! Oh Yes! They know stuff!

Doralyn Bigelow — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:02am

Amazing!!

Thanks for sharing this story. It's just amazing to know how much we miss in the world because of our hectic schedules and every day life! But kids, they don't a miss a thing!

Have a great day & God Bless!!

Johnnie Wright — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:09am

Music To My Ears

It is wonderful the little miracles that no one sees. We that appreciate them are few that is a miracle. Once I was visiting a friend whose brother had a band practice, there was a gentleman there who played The Kennedy Center, The New York Center for the Performing Arts and countless other accolades. I was mesmerized standing next to the keyboard and watching this unfold in front of me. How priceless this talent is for us to not slow down. Everyday to look for the beauty and as we say nuggets in life, so you can live to live or you can love to live, I choose love to live. So for those that seem to harried thank you for not taking the front row to the wonders of life although it is a shame for you the view up front for those like myself is truly breathtaking.

Richard Beam — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:28am

Preception.something to think about!..

This is a wounderful article. Great read for all of us it is greately appreciated. Thanks

Elizabeth Redd — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:33am

There's a Problem Here...

This is a great subject and one we need to delve into. Although the story is very romantic, I feel it is unfair to expect people to stop and appreciate beautiful music by a virtuoso, especially when rushing in the morning. The children could hear it. But the children are oblivious to hectic deadlines and having to be at work where the boss will be breathing down their neck for being just one minute late.

This experiment only proved that people lead very busy and hectic lives. They do not have the time to stop and smell the roses at that particular moment or time of day. And for the most part, that includes more than 95% of the this audience (better networker dot com). Yes, I dare call everyone out on this.

Most of the networkers here are still working a regular job trying to climb out of their J.O.B. We are all one giant step above the masses. But it is unfair to tempt people with sweet beautiful music when they are trying to get their kids to school or the baby-sitter and then make it to work on time.

The experiment should have had Joshua play at the subway and then at another time play at a local public park. The circumstances would have been almost the same except for people being in a hurry.
The audience would probably not know who Joshua was and would have a minute or two, or maybe the whole 45 minutes to listen. And most of them would have told Joshua that is good enough for Carnegie Hall! And he would have made more than $32.00 for that hour!

Under the circumstances the experiment was done the results were predictable. Experiments usually involve trying different approaches. This was only one approach.
I know a thing or two about perception, I teach it.

Paul Camarinha — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:55am

Perception

Wonderful post, Adrian!
We so often get caught up in our own world that we never look outside our own "box"...a great reality check, especiall for internet marketers!
Thanks, Martin
http://www.empower2go.com

Martin Casper — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 8:57am

Perception Really Is King!

First Adrian I'd like to commend you on a incredible post. It's these very post that make Better Networker one of the best educational resource in the Network Marketing arena.

Dwain Carbon — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 9:16am

Stop and listen....smell....feel

I was just thinking this very thing on my walk this morning. If for just 5 minutes, take the time to stop and listen to the music, smell the rose or feel a hug - it may be your last.

Rita Blair — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 9:22am

Sad... But True...

Interesting article... It so unfortunate that we allow ourselves to live such rushed and pressured lives. Though... we choose to do so. The question is... why are we here...? If we can not stop for just a moment in time to appreciate the smaller beautiful things in life... what is the point? As hectic our days can be... we still have to make room in our lives to get in touch... and to be in tuned with those moments of delight. Instead we go through the motions of just existing and facing the demands of life. Every now and then we should practice letting go of all the negativity and release the stresses in our bodies and mind... and just stop for that brief moment... to appreciate the finer things in life. If we do that more... just maybe... we might look forward to waking up in the morning and begin to appreciate the gifts in life that we all just walk right by and forget about...

Derek Fobert — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 10:30am

The Key to Perception is Un-Learning Bad Habits...

Great post Adrian. Thanks for sharing. I remember that article from a couple years back. Great way to dramatize the point. But as Paul pointed out, a bit skewed.

It was morning rush hour at commuting hub for government employees. So as a social experiment, it would have been informative to run the same scenario in a number of diff locations/time frames, etc.

That being said: the point illustrated is still valid. And the key to opening our eyes and seeing what's really there is preconceptions and expectations. Our habits dull the senses, until we go through life as a predictable/necessary routine.

Only when we approach things with a blank slate can we truly see things as they are and appreciate beauty and excellence. Always trust your instincts! It's why kids so often "get it" before most adults...

We are all born with this innate sense and ability.

So rather than trying to acquire a skill, it's really a matter of "un-learning" the bad habits or preconceptions that are mucking up the works.

Speaking of which - how many of us network marketers will take time out of our busy days to watch the same performance? You can see a video of the performance here: http://vurl.bz/s/Violin

I love this industry because it gives us the time freedom to actually stop and smell the roses (or listen to the violin)!

Will Schwartz — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 10:35am

Valuable insights

Adrian,

Really appreciate the insight this article reveals.

The interesting thing to me is how much this concept must be on the minds of like minded enlightened people.

Warren Little — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 11:20am

Target Market came to mind for me

Awesome article Adrian!

This got me thinking about a common perception that is often portrayed in our industry.

Many of us got into Network Marketing getting sold on the "perception" of making millions with minimal work, sitting in our underwear working on a computer...I know that's what got me interested! It also was the reason I was a HUGE failure at first. I thought that EVERYONE would be interested in my opportunity.

We may be able to "pick experts out of the crowd" when they are in their optimal locations (the theater for Joshua here) but when they are placed in a room full of individuals who aren't targeted, not many people recognize the "expert"

This got me thinking about why people remain stagnant in their business and are stuck in the "hoping this works" stage, instead of sitting down, developing a skillset and marketing themselves and their newly developed skillset.

Taking the message of this post the way that I did means that....we need to get absolutely certain on our target market, without this, we're lonely violinists playing in a crowd of heavy metal fans and not getting the success we deserve.

Take the time to develop a skill, master this skill and market it to your target audience. You WILL become successful upon doing this.

Keep up the great work Adrian,
Chris Hughes
WhosChrisHughes.com

Chris Hughes — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 11:30am

Here is something similar

This poem I am Love - Read it twice a day for next 3 Days - You will feel better in some way

I am love I am peace I am joy I am serenity I am ecstasy I am happy! I am kindness I am goodness I am mildness I am healthy! I am power I am courage I am truth I am justice I am mercy I am compassion I am meek I am virtue I am empathy I am loving-kindness I am well I am trust I am forgiveness I am faith I am hope I am wisdom I am bliss I am awesome I am gracious I am kind I am loyalty I am lowliness of mind I am thoughtful I am harmony I am humility I am good I am pure I am beauty I am blessing I am gratitude I am positive I am integrity I am energy I am life I am brilliant I am light I am spirit I am love

Blessings are in YOUR Dreams & Visions

Steven Shaw — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 11:58am

My daughter and I flew to

My daughter and I flew to Seattle to see a friend a month after the World Trade Center buildings fell. People were frantic about flying, and tensions were high all over the country. When we got to the airport for our return trip to Dallas, the security line was so long that it wound around for what was probably at least a quarter of a mile. The atmosphere was crazy with stress, fear and worry, but as we rounded one of the many corners into yet another corridor, the level of stress dropped dramatically because there was a man playing violin on an upper level. He stood at the edge of a balcony that looked down onto the floor where we stood in line, and just played and played. Some pieces I recognized, some were unfamiliar, but everyone visibly relaxed, whether they liked the tunes or not. It was amazing, and made me think of exactly what you've addressed here. I am in charge of my own state of mind, so if I miss the genius in front of me, I have only myself to blame. Thanks for the wonderful reminder. ~Judy

Judy Blackwell — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 12:07pm

The REAL lesson: Timing is everything in life

I have to agree with Paul Camarinha. Time and place are critical factors, and any experiment or test needs to have a proper control to make the findings valid. The emotional impact of this incident is powerful, but that doesn't necessarily make it entirely valid.

The older I get, the more I realize that time and place are what overwhelmingly determine whether something is good or bad, desirable or undesirable.

Weeds are plants growing in the wrong place at the wrong time. A rose growing on a football field is a weed. So are pumpkins growing in a wheat field.

The time and place for this test were simply inappropriate. At the concert, the patrons were there specifically to listen to Joshua play, and were willing to pay top dollar to do so. At the train station, they were there to transit from one place to another, in a limited time frame, with a higher priority attached. Trains don't wait. Time clocks don't stop.

The real point of the story is the opportunity that network marketing offers us to enjoy freedom of choice... to be able to break free from deadlines and schedules.

How many successful MLM leaders would even have been at the station, regardless of the timing?

The alternative lesson here?

There are a couple:

1. Choose the time and place of your presentation to suit your audience if you want to enjoy success and recognition.

2. "Cast not your pearls before swine". (It applies to your opportunity as well. Do you demean it and its value by desperately offering it to people who won't appreciate its value?)

John Counsel

John Counsel — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 12:15pm

So good to be reminded

Thank you so much for sharing this. We do get so caught up in the busyness of our day to day lives. Even if everything we are doing is good, we need to take some time to appreciate the beauty around us.

This is a good reminder for all of us.

Julie Cockburn — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 12:22pm

Reality Check

Very realistic observations from Paul in regard of this "experiment".
But more so what makes Joshua recognized for his skills and talent?
Mass media exposure. Same guy, same skills and no recognition of his
talents and guess what??? It is really left to anyone being able to
perceive what's being offered and at which level. I know for a fact. I
obviously feel I have the talent, the skills, the scope and
determination but after over 40 years the only absent factor is mass
exposure. I've kept on because I strongly believe in myself and have
achieved satisfactory results.. but not with the mechanics of what
Joshua was blessed with but only because I've not been a quitter. One
must not forget that when reality sinks in.. all our dreams and
aspirations can be challenged by outside circumstances and some less
welcome than others.
Turning 60, I can come forth and tell many that my life experiences
dictate that as much as we feel at peace with ourselves and are proud
of who we are, some events will determine that total sum of successes
or setbacks we will go through. The more set-backs and you can be sure
that it does take its toll as I can attest for.
How it translates into networking is that creating visibility is one
thing... getting the due response is up in the air.

Peter Riden — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 4:51pm

Isn't life great!

Adrian thank you for this wonderful post. And Wil thank you for letting us see the actual experience. What a wonderful industry where we can associate with people who actually stop and smell the flowers.

ALOHA Jim

Jim Peterson — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 1:42pm

Missing the Opertunity's

Many opportunity's are all around us each and every day. As illustrated in the text above, we all need to stop, listen, and become more aware of the important values of our lives. We miss out on so many opportunity's that are right in front of us because we are rushing through our lives. If we can stop once and a while and look and listen ,we can grab hold of opportunity's we normally would walk right by.

Thank you for the insight.
Kevin Joubert

kevin Joubert — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 2:01pm

Gratitude

Thank you Adrian and everyone who has contributed to this thought provoking post, every insight has been very valuable to read.

The world would be a better place if we could all take a few seconds to show or even just feel gratitude for the beauty around us.

Gratitude changes perception and how we see the world.

Here is a great quote I had delivered to my in box this morning from Simple Truths that will help spread that feeling.

Gratitude is the king of all virtues. Without it...there is no happiness in your life. It's really that simple.

Here's what Melody Beattie said:

"Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. I can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow."

How true it is! Today, I'd like to share a 3 minute movie that captures the essence of gratitude more than anything I've ever seen. The words, the music, the photographs, in a word are...BEAUTIFUL!

So if you want to make your heart smile, just go to http://www.danceintherainmovie.com to watch. And don't forget to forward this to everyone you know and love. It'll make their day!

Donna Newby and... — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 2:01pm

Thanks for the lesson

I am so thankful to be a home schooling mom. I get to stop and see the little things in life, most of the time. But I, too, find myself filling up my days and rushing through them only to come to the end of the day and fall in bed to do the same thing tomorrow. Thanks for the reminder to slow down again. We all need that reminder sometimes.
May the Lord bless each of us to be able to stop and smell the roses more often.

Teresa Baine — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 2:11pm

I am Blessed

It is amaizing that every day we go about with blinders like horses. It also reminds me of the narration Dr. N. Hill gave about three feet to gold.

Terfa Nyamor — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 2:33pm

Perception is reality

This makes me wonder how much of the "real" world I miss every day due to my seeing what I expect versus exploring all I see.
Thanks for a great article.

Mark Bushey — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 3:12pm

Recognizing opportunity

You could also say, "What kind of opportunities do we pass up because we are to busy to listen?" People create their own busyness so they do not take or have the time to see what is literally in front of them.

Tim Bouchey — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 4:42pm

One conclusion reached from

One conclusion reached from this experiment could be this: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made, how many other things are we missing?
I am not too sure how this relates to faking it till you make it though????????. He was definately not faking it. I still think there is to much FAKING it going around.

Kerry Erasmus — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 6:28pm

Eyes to See

I have to admit, I have been one not to see. With such a hectic society, articles like this should be shown and practiced by others. Nice insight.

David Demangos — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 6:42pm

We See What We Expect to See

Wow! What a great story. There are so many lessons buried here that I hardly even know where to begin in this short space allowed for comments. I'm intrigued by the different responses of the children from the adults. Yes, time pressure and adult obligations certainly enter in here, but there's so much more! I also recently read a very interesting article about homeless people. I'm sure many of them have excellent skills and incredible talents as well, but none of us ever see them ... because we don't look. Our assumptions about life, in general, and the business world, in particular, really hobble our thinking and cause us to miss many great opportunities.

Sue White — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 7:39pm

Adrian, I'm just a little disappointed

Adrian, I'm just a little disappointed. Please carefully examine the post date on the posting I'm submitting for your review.

* Edit post
* Report this post
* Reply with quote

Perception.....

Postby Wally Pieper on 05 Sep 2009 08:47
Perception.....

...something to think about...

Washington, DC Metro Station on a cold January morning in 2007. The man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approx. 2 thousand people went through the station, most of them on their way to work. After 3 minutes a middle-aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule.

4 minutes later:
The violinist received his first dollar: a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

6 minutes:
A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.

10 minutes:
A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The child stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly.

45 minutes:
The musician played continuously. Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while. About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.

1 hour:
He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before Joshua Bell sold out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a true story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities. The questions raised: in a common place environment at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made.... How many other things are we missing?

During the 2008 campaign, Barak Obama openly stated what he would do as President, and true to his word, every radical idea he espoused is now being implemented, just as he promised.

Is it possible the entire country was blinded by the perception of style and ignored the actual substance of content? History and deeds are screaming YES.

Wally Pieper
366 Paradise Island Dr
DeFuniak Springs, Fla 32433
623 695 4654
[email protected]

Wally Pieper — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 9:12pm

Perception is reality

Advertising knows that and that is exactly what makes something more valuable than other. For example, Elvis Presley's sweaty cloth was so valuable by his fans, they would've paid a lot of money, but it wasn't the actual item what people would paid for, but what it represented and how it has been positioned. That sweaty cloth belong to Elvis. Wow!!!!

This also happens in our culture, in what we perceive, beautiful, fancy, cool.

I love this story,
Thanks for sharing.
Carina

Carina Franco — Mon, 09/28/2009 - 10:56pm